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Macros

We describe here various macros provided by Hecke.

Verbosity macros

There is a list of symbols called verbosity scopes which represent keywords used to trigger some particular macros within the codes. Each of these verbosity scopes is associated with a verbosity level, being set to by default. A verbosity macro is joined to a verbosity scope S and a value k (set to by default) such that, if the current verbosity level l of S is bigger than or equal to k, then the macro triggers a given action.

# add_verbosity_scopeMethod.

add_verbosity_scope(s::Symbol) -> Nothing

Add the symbol s to the list of (global) verbosity scopes.

Examples

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:MyScope)

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# set_verbosity_levelMethod.

set_verbosity_level(s::Symbol, l::Int) -> Int

If s represents a known verbosity scope, set the current verbosity level of s to l.

One can access the current verbosity level of s by calling the function get_verbosity_level.

If s is not yet known as a verbosity scope, the function raises an ErrorException showing the error message "Not a valid symbol". One can add s to the list of verbosity scopes by calling the function add_verbosity_scope.

Examples

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:MyScope)

julia> set_verbosity_level(:MyScope, 4)
4

julia> set_verbosity_level(:MyScope, 0)
0

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# get_verbosity_levelMethod.

get_verbosity_level(s::Symbol) -> Int

If s represents a known verbosity scope, return the current verbosity level of s.

One can modify the current verbosity level of s by calling the function set_verbosity_level.

If s is not yet known as a verbosity scope, the function raises an ErrorException showing the error message "Not a valid symbol". One can add s to the list of verbosity scopes by calling the function add_verbosity_scope.

Examples

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:MyScope)

julia> get_verbosity_level(:MyScope)
0

julia> set_verbosity_level(:MyScope, 4)
4

julia> get_verbosity_level(:MyScope)
4

julia> set_verbosity_level(:MyScope, 0)
0

julia> get_verbosity_level(:MyScope)
0

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Printings

# @vprintlnMacro.

@vprintln(S::Symbol, k::Int, msg::String)
@vprintln S k msg

@vprintln(S::Symbol, msg::String)
@vprintln S msg

This macro can be used to control printings inside the code.

The macro @vprintln takes two or three arguments: a symbol S specifying a verbosity scope, an optional integer k and a string msg. If k is not specified, it is set by default to .

To each verbosity scope S is associated a verbosity level l which is cached. If the verbosity level of S is bigger than or equal to , the macro @vprintln triggers the printing of the associated string msg followed by a newline.

One can add a new verbosity scope by calling the function add_verbosity_scope.

When starting a new instance, all the verbosity levels are set to . One can adjust the verbosity level of a verbosity scope by calling the function set_verbosity_level.

One can access the current verbosity level of a verbosity scope by calling the function get_verbosity_level.

Examples

We will set up different verbosity scopes with different verbosity levels in a custom function to show how to use this macro.

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:Test1);

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:Test2);

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:Test3);

julia> set_verbosity_level(:Test1, 1);

julia> set_verbosity_level(:Test2, 3);

julia> function vprint_example()
       @vprintln :Test1 "Triggered"
       @vprintln :Test2 2 "Triggered"
       @vprintln :Test3 "Not triggered"
       @vprintln :Test2 4 "Not triggered"
       end
vprint_example (generic function with 1 method)

julia> vprint_example()
Triggered
Triggered

If one does not setup in advance a verbosity scope, the macro will raise an ExceptionError showing the error message "Not a valid symbol".

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# @vprintMacro.

@vprint(S::Symbol, k::Int, msg::String)
@vprint S k msg

@vprint(S::Symbol, msg::String)
@vprint S msg

The same as @vprintln, but without the final newline.

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Actions

# @v_doMacro.

@v_do(S::Symbol, k::Int, act::Expr)
@v_do S k act

@v_do(S::Symbol, act::Expr)
@v_do S act

This macro can be used to control actions inside the code.

The macro @v_do takes two or three arguments: a symbol S specifying a verbosity scope, an optional integer k and an action act. If k is not specified, it is set by default to .

To each verbosity scope S is associated a verbosity level l. If the verbosity level of S is bigger than or equal to , the macro @v_do triggers the action act.

One can add a new verbosity scope by calling the function add_verbosity_scope.

When starting a new instance, all the verbosity levels are set to . One can adjust the verbosity level of a verbosity scope by calling the function set_verbosity_level.

One can access the current verbosity level of a verbosity scope by calling the function get_verbosity_level.

Examples

We will set up different verbosity scopes with different verbosity levels in a custom function to show how to use this macro.

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:Test1);

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:Test2);

julia> add_verbosity_scope(:Test3);

julia> set_verbosity_level(:Test1, 1);

julia> set_verbosity_level(:Test2, 3);

julia> function v_do_example(a::Int, b::Int, c::Int, d::Int)
       @v_do :Test1 a = 2*a
       @v_do :Test2 2 b = 3*b
       @v_do :Test3 c = 4*c
       @v_do :Test2 4 d = 5*d
       return (a, b, c, d)
       end
v_do_example (generic function with 1 method)

julia> v_do_example(1,1,1,1)
(2, 3, 1, 1)

If one does not setup in advance a verbosity scope, the macro will raise an ExceptionError showing the error message "Not a valid symbol".

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Assertion macros

There is a list of symbols called assertion scopes which represent keywords used to trigger some particular macros within the codes. Each of these assertion scopes is associated with an assertion level, being set to by default. An assertion macro is joined to an assertion scope S and a value k (set to by default) such that, if the current assertion level l of S is bigger than or equal to k, then the macro triggers an action on the given assertion

# add_assertion_scopeMethod.

add_assertion_scope(s::Symbol) -> Nothing

Add the symbol s to the list of (global) assertion scopes.

Examples

julia> add_assertion_scope(:MyScope)

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# set_assertion_levelMethod.

set_assertion_level(s::Symbol, l::Int) -> Int

If s represents a known assertion scope, set the current assertion level of s to l.

One can access the current assertion level of s by calling the function get_assertion_level.

If s is not yet known as an assertion scope, the function raises an ErrorException showing the error message "Not a valid symbol". One can add s to the list of assertion scopes by calling the function add_assertion_scope.

Examples

julia> add_assertion_scope(:MyScope)

julia> set_assertion_level(:MyScope, 4)
4

julia> set_assertion_level(:MyScope, 0)
0

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# get_assertion_levelMethod.

get_assertion_level(s::Symbol) -> Int

If s represents a symbol of a known assertion scope, return the current assertion level of s.

One can modify the current assertion level of s by calling the function set_assertion_level.

If s is not yet known as an assertion scope, the function raises an ErrorException showing the error message "Not a valid symbol". One can add s to the list of assertion scopes by calling the function add_assertion_scope.

Examples

julia> add_assertion_scope(:MyScope)

julia> get_assertion_level(:MyScope)
0

julia> set_assertion_level(:MyScope, 1)
1

julia> get_assertion_level(:MyScope)
1

julia> set_assertion_level(:MyScope, 0)
0

julia> get_assertion_level(:MyScope)
0

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Check

# @hassertMacro.

@hassert(S::Symbol, k::Int, assert::Expr)
@hassert S k assert

@hassert(S::Symbol, assert::Expr)
@hassert S assert

This macro can be used to control assertion checks inside the code.

The macro @hassert takes two or three arguments: a symbol S specifying an assertion scope, an optional integer k and an assertion assert. If k is not specified, it is set by default to .

To each assertion scope S is associated an assertion level l which is cached. If the assertion level of S is bigger than or equal to , the macro @hassert triggers the check of the assertion assert. If assert is wrong, an AssertionError is thrown.

One can add a new assertion scope by calling the function add_assertion_scope.

When starting a new instance, all the assertion levels are set to . One can adjust the assertion level of an assertion scope by calling the function set_assertion_level.

One can access the current assertion level of an assertion scope by calling the function get_assertion_level.

Examples

We will set up different assertion scopes with different assertion levels in a custom function to show how to use this macro.

julia> add_assertion_scope(:MyScope)

julia> get_assertion_level(:MyScope)
0

julia> function hassert_test(x::Int)
       @hassert :MyScope 700 mod(x, 3) == 0
       return div(x, 3)
       end
hassert_test (generic function with 1 method)

julia> hassert_test(2)
0

julia> set_assertion_level(:MyScope, 701);

julia> try hassert_test(2)
       catch e e
       end
AssertionError("\$(Expr(:escape, :(mod(x, 3) == 0)))")

julia> hassert_test(3)
1

julia> set_assertion_level(:MyScope, 0)
0

If one does not setup in advance an assertion scope, the macro will raise an ExceptionError showing the error message "Not a valid symbol".

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Miscellaneous

# @reqMacro.

@req(assert, msg)
@req assert msg

Check whether the assertion assert is true. If not, throw an ArgumentError with error message msg.

The macro @req takes two arguments: the first one is an assertion assert (an expression which returns a boolean) and a string msg corresponding to the desired error message to be returned whenever assert is false.

If the number of arguments is not 2, an AssertionError is raised.

Examples

julia> function req_test(x::Int)
       @req iseven(x) "x must be even"
       return div(x,2)
       end
req_test (generic function with 1 method)

julia> try req_test(3)
       catch e e
       end
ArgumentError("x must be even")

julia> try req_test(2)
       catch e e
       end
1

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